ANTI-SLAVERY
SOCIETY

FIGHTING SLAVERY TODAY

Uncle Tom's Cabin

Illustration from an early edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin

The first installment of Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) —  the novel which was to bring her international fame — appeared in June 1851 in the National Era, an anti-slavery paper in Washington DC.

It was serialized until April 1852 and was based of accounts of runaway slaves which she heard, and evidence of their conditions of slaves which she gathered, while visiting Kentucky, a Slave State.  It was a powerful indictment of slavery, it did not attract much interest until it was published as a novel in 1852.  More than 500,000 copies were sold in the first five years in the USA alone.

Although Harriet Beecher Stowe became a hated figure in the slave-owning States, her novel galvanized anti-slavery sentiment in the North.  Many historians regard her novel as a significant force in leading to the Civil War which ended in the defeat of the Confederate States of America and the abolition of slavery in the USA.

Born in Litchfield, Connecticut.  While visiting Kentucky she heard accounts of runaway slaves.

Between 1850 and 1852 she began writing Uncle Tom's Cabin.  Between June 1851 until April 1852 it was serialized in a newspaper, but it was not until it was published in book form that it ignited a nation, selling 500,000 copies in the USA during five years.

In 1853 she wrote A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin, which contained a massive array of data on the institution of slavery.

In 1856 she continued her campaign against slavery with the publication of her Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp.


 

 

Links to pages dealing with the abolition of slavery in the USA:

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Uncle Tom's Cabin

Abraham Lincoln

American Civil War

13th Amendment to the Bill of Rights

Massachusetts

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society

Vermont

Virgin Islands


Links to pages dealing with the abolition of slavery in other countries:

British campaign against slavery

Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton (1786-1846)

Thomas Clarkson  (1760-1845)

Denmark

Peter Van Scholten

Granville Sharp (1735-1813)

Slave Trade Act 1807

Slave Trade Act 1824

Slave Trade Act 1843

Slavery Abolition Act 1833

Joseph Sturge (1793-1859)

William Wilberforce  (1759-1833)


Links to other pages dealing with slavery:

Does slavery still exist?

SLAVERY SLAVE
TRADE
HUMAN
SACRIFICE

BONDED
LABOR

HIERODULIC
SERVITUDE

TRAFFICKING

CHILD
LABOR

  2003 by the Anti-Slavery Society. The text on any page may be reproduced provided that the source is acknowledged.  This does not apply to photos.